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App - Practice my Saxophone Scales

Philly123

Member
Messages
185
I wondered if anyone has any knowledge of this app. It looks as though it might be useful to help me learn all of the scales that I still haven't learned. it's not very expensive £1.49 - but it looks as if you need to buy a few in order to get all of the scales. I'm wondering if it would add anything more than just going through the scales I have in my ABRSM book.
 

Ivan

Undecided
Subscriber
Messages
7,346
I wondered if anyone has any knowledge of this app. It looks as though it might be useful to help me learn all of the scales that I still haven't learned. it's not very expensive £1.49 - but it looks as if you need to buy a few in order to get all of the scales. I'm wondering if it would add anything more than just going through the scales I have in my ABRSM book.
I'm not an App aficionado but charging per scale sounds like a swizz
 

Philly123

Member
Messages
185
Doesn't look too attractive to my eyes
I think each app includes a group of scales, I've seen about 3 apps.

Doesn't look too attractive to my eyes - I'm new to this app business, so I think I'm just going a bit Appy. I've actually already downloaded something similar, which I've never used! Maybe I'll give it a miss and use what I got.
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Have a look at this:

http://jazzadvice.com/how-to-practice-scales-for-speed/

I think the Jazz Advice site is a perfect example of 'learn a little at a time really well, then learn a little more' - otherwise you might do your head in! Decide what you need to work on and don't let the million and one other things on the site make you think that you have an impossible mountain to climb.
 

Philly123

Member
Messages
185
Have a look at this:

http://jazzadvice.com/how-to-practice-scales-for-speed/

I think the Jazz Advice site is a perfect example of 'learn a little at a time really well, then learn a little more' - otherwise you might do your head in! Decide what you need to work on and don't let the million and one other things on the site make you think that you have an impossible mountain to climb.
Thanks,

I've had quick look. There's a lot of useful info and advice on this site. Should keep me busy for some time. Thanks again.
 

allansto

Senior Member
Messages
471
Have a look at this:

http://jazzadvice.com/how-to-practice-scales-for-speed/

I think the Jazz Advice site is a perfect example of 'learn a little at a time really well, then learn a little more' - otherwise you might do your head in! Decide what you need to work on and don't let the million and one other things on the site make you think that you have an impossible mountain to climb.
An excellent resource........Thanks heaps
Allansto
 

kernewegor

Bon vivant, raconteur and twit
Messages
1,736
Hey Philly123, Don't forget to check here http://cafesaxophone.com/showthread.php?9706-Beginners-Music-Theory the link to Taming the saxophone...:thumb:
Indeed. Pete's stuff is much more accessible as well as having a really useful menu to work from. A lot of the stuff on the Jazz Advice site looks pretty daunting to anyone lacking a music degree. Also it lacks a 'road map' not merely for beginners but for pretty well anyone who isn't sure about what they need to prioritize, and the menus are so extensive that you could wander about for days with the increasing feeling that you are never going to master it all.... having said that, provided you have a fair idea of what you want to find out, its really good.

A good plan is to use accessible resources ('cos they don't throw you in at the deep end) and, when you have mastered whatever bit it is you are working on, to go to a brain-crunching site for more material, armed with the knowledge of what you want to find out more about...

Different sites will also give different slants on things, which can be helpful - as long as you don't find it confusing!

Finally, don't forget that technical mastery of absolutely everything isn't essential to make music which has merit and is good to listen to. By no means all good musicians are virtuosi! Find some Mound City Blue Blowers stuff on youtube. If a comb and tissue paper and kazoos can produce stuff like that, the lesson surely is that the student and improving player can make music - and good music, too - while still working long term on technique.
 
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