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Any suggestions for follow-up to Lacour?

Discussion in 'Teaching' started by Andante cantabile, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    I am near the end of Book 2 of Guy Lacour's 50 etudes faciles et progressives, and I now wonder what to tackle next. I would prefer 20th-century music. Two possibilities are the Karg-Elert caprices (some of them, anyway) and the Twenty Modern Studies by James Rae. I have enough 19th-century music, and anything before that I prefer to listen to.

    Does anyone have any suggestions?
     
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  3. tenorviol

    tenorviol Full of frets in North Shropshire

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    Sorry can't asssit explicitly, but I'm fascinated by the Karg-Elert as I like his organ music.... I shall go a-hunting....
     
  4. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    That's an angle about Karg-Elert I didn't know about. BTW, there is a lot of good saxophone music by French composers, but French publishers don't make it easy to find out what level a book might be.
     
  5. tenorviol

    tenorviol Full of frets in North Shropshire

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    In my experience French music publishing is expensive and poor quality - ask any organist! As a trite example. The Fauré Requiem vocal score, published by Novello is about £5 and the Oxford edition is about £12. Both good editions, and inexpensive. The Duruflé Requiem (similar sized piece and popular, albeit it doesn't ge the Classic FM exposure that the Fauré gets) is only available in a French edition by Durand and it cost me over £25 10 years ago. The paper quality is dreadful and the binding worse.
     
  6. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    I just looked at various Ferling editions of the 48 studies available on sheetmusicplus in the US. BTW, I have no intention at the moment of learning them. The Leduc Editon is $31.05, the Billaudot one $21.95, and the Universal Oboen edition $24.95. The first two are French, the third presumably German. OTH, you can get Alfred for $6.99 and SMC for $8.50 (both of them are American).

    I don't know how they differ in detail. Leduc is arranged by Marcel Mule. Billaudot has high legibility. I would want to look at both these before making a decision.

    If you are an oboe player also, the bargain is Carl Fischer which gives you the text and two CDs of piano accompaniment. For those not aware of it, the oboe and the saxophone have the same written range, but the oboe is of course in C.
     
  7. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    In the end I went for the 20 Modern studies by James Rae. At the same time I bought his 12 modern etudes. They are quite different to the things I have tackled up to now, but they are enjoyable, and they will require me to learn some new techniques.
     
  8. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    Some months ago I bought the Karg-Elert music. I find it really interesting, quite different to the etudes I have been playing (including the 48 Ferlings), but not all that easy. I am also doing oboe etudes by Karl Mille. They were written at about the same time, and I find them a good way to approach the more modern idiom as it was in 1920s. Certainly not avant-garde at the time, and a long way from contemporary material.
     
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  9. Guenne

    Guenne Senior Member

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    The Ferlings have got piano backings some years ago, are you aware of that (that's the reason I play them with my students)?
    What I find interesting are the 16 Etudes Rhythmo-Techniques by Gilles Senon.

    Here is a link to the list of stuff you can choose from at our 2nd exam ("Silver") here in Austria.
    Maybe you find something you don't know yet.

    B

    Cheers, Guenne
     
  10. Andante cantabile

    Andante cantabile Senior Member

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    Guenne

    Yes, I was aware of the piano part for the Ferlings, but I much prefer them for solo saxophone. I play them on tenor and on alto. The version I prefer is this:

    https://www.idrs.org/scores/ferling/contents.html

    The arranger suggests repeats, and that makes the studies more substantial.

    Thank you very much for the suggestion of Gilles Senon. That looks really good, and I'll try them as soon as I can. BTW, I couldn't get the link to work.

    Kevgermany: I would like to thank you for your interest.
     
  11. kevgermany

    kevgermany ex Landrover Nut Cafe Moderator

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    It's nothing. I think there's a lot more scope to playing a sax than we usually see here. Most revolves around jazz/rock/ska/funk, but it has a huge opportunity in more classical works.
     

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