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Another issue with embrochure...

StanGhetz

New Member
Messages
4
Help .....

I am now beginning to understand that for correct embouchure, the teeth on upper jaw must be on mouthpiece, taking the load and leaving the lower jaw able to relax etc. For me, this could be a little problem.

As a result of an accident many years ago, my two incisors (front teeth) are a piece of rather expensive ceramic dentistry. And at the time I had to promise the surgeon that I would not to load them, eg biting into dense objects etc, as the implants that anchor them in place are not embedded in significant amounts of bone (excuse the gory details).

Does anyone know if there is anything such as a tooth guard which would help to ‘spread the load’ to adjacent teeth……….I am hoping that this cannot be a unique problem!!

regards

StanG
 

kevgermany

ex Landrover Nut
Subscriber
Messages
21,947
You don't need to use your teeth on the mouthpiece. Although it's less common, many people use what's known as a double lip embouchure, which keeps the teeth away from the mouthpeice. Just 'lock' the mouthpiece between your lips, keeping the beak away from your teeth. Needs slightly stronger lip muscles, but it's not difficult.

And now your going to get the comments saying your teeth MUST contact the mouthpiece.... lol
 

Pete Thomas

Well-Known Member
Commercial Supporter
Messages
14,527
You don't need to use your teeth on the mouthpiece. Although it's less common, many people use what's known as a double lip embouchure, which keeps the teeth away from the mouthpeice.

This is worth trying, however I'm not sure it would spread the load enough to be safe in your situation.

I would recommend you see the dentist, who will either be able to make the type of thing you are talking about. The problem is they may advise you not to play (not what you want to hear!)
 

BigMartin

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,916
Surely there isn't much pressure between the teeth and moutchpiece anyway? I wowould have thought no more than when you just close the bottom and top teeth together normally. Shouldn't the lips be taking all the strain? Or am I doing domething wrong (unthinkable!)?
 

Pete Thomas

Well-Known Member
Commercial Supporter
Messages
14,527
Surely there isn't much pressure between the teeth and moutchpiece anyway? I wowould have thought no more than when you just close the bottom and top teeth together normally. Shouldn't the lips be taking all the strain? Or am I doing domething wrong (unthinkable!)?

No, this sounds very reasonable. It might be worth taking a mouthpiece along and showing the dentist what is involved.

Another point would be to develop an embouchure that does not rely on too much pressure, ie m,ake sure you don't get into using very hard reeds or open tip/short lay mouthpieces.
 

VirusKiller

Member
Messages
449
Two things that I've noticed:

1) With what I believe to be "conventional" embouchure, my top teeth rest only very lightly on the mouthpiece.

2) When inadvertently using a double embouchure, I attempted a bit of vibrato and found it a lot more difficult than conventional embouchure, because the top lip is a lot more "spongy" and that makes lower jaw control of the pitch harder.
 

Fraser Jarvis

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,912
When inadvertently using a double embouchure, I attempted a bit of vibrato and found it a lot more difficult
Firstly i have used the double lip ombouchure from day one as it just felt natural to me, i never knew there was a right or wrong way to do it, and like you say vibrato, in my case "was" more difficult to achieve early on using this tequnique but now i have built up my facial muscles it's as easy as with "teeth on top"

If you are used to playing with a conventional embouchure there's lots of mouthpiece patches on the market, and i sopose you could even stack them to get a greater thickness.....or a more extreme solution...try using a gumshield, you know, like boxers wear.
 

jtyler

New Member
Messages
9
This is certainly an unusual situation. I recommend that you don't really do anything until you check it out with your dentist. If you have to for some reason, try that "double lip approach."
 

thomsax

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,921

Nick Wyver

noisy
Subscriber
Messages
5,993
I have a very solid connection between me and the mouthpiece - my head isn't quite resting on the mouthpiece but there's quite a lot of pressure going through my teeth. I find it just helps to free my lower jaw and I like the feel of the solidity. Consequently that connection can be quite damaging without some form of protection. I tried commercial mouthpiece patches but I never found one that wasn't utter crap. With one make I got through 3 in one gig. For the last 10 years or so I've been using cut up bits of bicycle innertube glued on with Evostick. These manage to last a few weeks before my teeth drill through them. You have ask why can't the patch manufacturers use the same stuff? Well, I'm sure we all know the answer to that.
 
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johnboy

Senior Member
Messages
1,179
You old cyNick (couldn't resist it).
But seriously, I wish I could find something to use. Soft patches set my teeth on edge, so I can't use them.

John.
 
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dorono

Member
Messages
28
This is worth trying, however I'm not sure it would spread the load enough to be safe in your situation.

I would recommend you see the dentist, who will either be able to make the type of thing you are talking about. The problem is they may advise you not to play (not what you want to hear!)

I would agree with that! You may need to go to several dentists to find one that can provide you with a solution. If you haven't already done so, I'd consider trying a thick mouthpiece patch since it's an easier solution than changing your embouchure.
 

Christian H

New Member
Messages
8
If you or anyone else is looking for decent patches I bought some a few months back and I'm still on the first one. They seem to last forever, even with my razor sharp incisors. What's more they are jolly good value.

I promise this is not a shameless plug, just something that I've personally been really impressed by. Produced in the UK, you can order on paypal mpc-patch@blueyonder.co.uk

If this is out of place, apologies.
Christian
 

Christian H

New Member
Messages
8
Sorry Nick, so for your information they are produced by FAM (Face Ache Mike) somewhere in the NW, no website, just the e-mail address and a jolly nice chap at the end of it.

The patches are self adhesive, tough and transparent, 0.35mm thin, and if memory serves me right just under £10 for 10 patches incl. postage. Brilliant! Well worth a punt. Before these my razors used to cut a trench into any patch. I'm so impressed I could almost buy the company!!!! Drop Mike a line for more info.
 

milandro

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,488
I have successfully tried some teflon tape by CS Hyde company (they have many thicknesses, widths and lengths ) their adhesive is non toxic as it appears from the specs sheet
 
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