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Reeds acid reed

Good idea.

Also there are more bacteria on plastic pallets than on wooden pallets.
Like this.
wetreed.JPG
 
I think this is the right moment to point out that there are bacteria everywhere.
And that is not a problem, as long as they are not the kind of bacteria (a minority) that could give you some illness.
.....
Actually, at our place of work they clean with bacterial solutions (there must also be some kind of detergent in there). The idea is that when you cover the surfaces with harmless bacteria, there is no room for pathogenic bacteria to grow. Studies have shown that this works.
I always get a bit frustrated and angry when health officials use rules that seem to imply that you need to work in a sterile environment. Sterile environments are not healthy, we need to keep our immune system in shape by exposing ourselves to (harmless) intruders.
A lot of bacteria are falsely seen as bad. It comes from the simplification: everything that is not with us is against us.
Which is a mindset that will shorten your life. Covid learned us that we know too little of the immune system. Worrying seems to be bad for it. So I try to worry exclusively about the known risks that I can influence. It helps to avoid food poisoning. Also a lot of bacteria lurking in the dark are still unknown, so I cant be bothered.
 
Many bacteria are essential, good, annoying, bad, lethal... And right place OK, wrong place bad.

On the whole, I wouldn't strive to inhale high density, fruiting bacteria. Just makes work for the microbiome's host.

Anyway, woodpad said bacteria isn't the problem here...
 
I think a modern problem is the rounding up of all the good bacteria and infesting little pots of dairy produce with them, thus depleting the rest of the environment and leaving it to the bad.
You have Elie Metchnikoff to blame for that.


Talking of Rooskiis, I'm surprised no one has suggested pure grain alcohol...
 
You have Elie Metchnikoff to blame for that.


Talking of Rooskiis, I'm surprised no one has suggested pure grain alcohol...
According to Metchnikoff Bulgarian yogurt was the best for a long life. Now as the average UK lifespan tops Bulgaria with 6.3 years she will advice to eat pickled eggs from the UK, neglecting beer as the source of old age.
 
According to Metchnikoff Bulgarian yogurt was the best for a long life. Now as the average UK lifespan tops Bulgaria with 6.3 years she will advice to eat pickled eggs from the UK, neglecting beer as the source of old age.
he

But the bit that relevant might be

Metchnikoff and his assistants had shown that sour milk didn’t spoil because of its acidity: In their experiments, microbes converted milk sugar into lactic acid, which, in turn, killed rot-causing germs in a laboratory dish. He speculated that if these microbes produced the same acidity in the human intestine, they might halt the “intestinal putrefaction” he believed precipitated aging.
Maybe "reed putrefaction" precipitated reed aging?

(Hint: it didn't work for humans)
 
Maybe "reed putrefaction" precipitated reed aging?

(Hint: it didn't work for humans)
Leuconostoc Mesenteroides, the fastest lactic acid producer, cant find food in a reed and it doesn't thrive in the human guts, so it has no relevance for these problems. When we compare the gut flora of the modern human with that of the bushman it is very poor. A richer one gives a chance to improve immune reactions.
 
Leuconostoc Mesenteroides, the fastest lactic acid producer, cant find food in a reed and it doesn't thrive in the human guts, so it has no relevance for these problems. When we compare the gut flora of the modern human with that of the bushman it is very poor. A richer one gives a chance to improve immune reactions.
Why do you single out "Leuconostoc Mesenteroides"?
I don't see how this species is relevant in this context.
You can't find it in youghourt (typical youghourt species are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus), nor can you find it on reeds (as far as I know). So why bring it up here????
....
BTW: I did my thesis on Leuconostoc Mesenteroides about 35 years ago
 
After heating the reed with vinegar and drying it plays well. Still tastes a bit funky, so I wait some time before using it.
Also it seems to be slightly stronger. It is not enough to be certain and I have to measure the reed strength before and after the vinegar treatment of the next reed. How can I build a reed strengthometer?
 
Why do you single out "Leuconostoc Mesenteroides"?
I don't see how this species is relevant in this context.
You can't find it in youghourt (typical youghourt species are Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus), nor can you find it on reeds (as far as I know). So why bring it up here????
....
BTW: I did my thesis on Leuconostoc Mesenteroides about 35 years ago
Nice that you know him so well. I met him several times in factories and he goes sour at an incredible speed.
As Metchnikoff prioritized acid production speed and made a choice for Bulgarian yoghurt, I thought his choice was based on acid production speed. My mistake. I will ad your thesis to my reading list.

Bulgarian yoghurt isn't very acid for a yoghurt. So Metchnikoff went for a food used in an area with a high life expectancy which didn't support his theory. According to the same theory miso should be unhealthy. Something around 150 million people from a country with high life expectancy would see as wrong.

And his study is also not relevant for reeds.
 
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