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Latin #295

Wade Cornell

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This is a slinky slow Bossa Nova written by a wonderful Portuguese guitarist and sung by an Indonesian woman who has a great feel for this style. It's in Concert D Major, but has all of those tricky changes you've got to hear/anticipate. Lots of opportunities to play but plaing over a singer is bad form. If you do it live you'll see the daggers come out!
Tenor and soprano play in E Major. Baritone, alto and sopranino play in B Major.
The first track is with sopranino, the second is all yours.
This track is embedded with the friendly permission by the creatives on wikiloops.com
View: https://www.wikiloops.com/backingtrack-jam-121995.php

This track is embedded with the friendly permission by the creatives on wikiloops.com
View: https://www.wikiloops.com/backingtrack-jam-116538.php
 

guidocreo

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225
Locality
anzio - Italy
...Lots of opportunities to play but plaing over a singer is bad form. If you do it live you'll see the daggers come out!
...
Depends on the awareness of the singer and on the sobriety of the saxophone player !
I love playing with singers but I ask permission first. ;)
I'll try a take later.
 
OP
Wade Cornell

Wade Cornell

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Yes can hear you much better on this one. Nice phrasing and solo ideas. Watch your tuning about 1/4 tone sharp especially in the upper octave. Very gentle playing that fits.
 

guidocreo

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Messages
225
Locality
anzio - Italy
Yes can hear you much better on this one. Nice phrasing and solo ideas. Watch your tuning about 1/4 tone sharp especially in the upper octave. Very gentle playing that fits.
Thanks,
I'm trying to use again my JJ DV but I'm sharp on this sax (and, strangely, flat on my backup bari).
 
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Wade Cornell

Wade Cornell

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Very sorry about the tuning/intonation problem. That's a difficult situation. Doesn't matter too much when playing on one's own, but when there are tuned instruments behind you it stands out. Sometimes a different neck or mouthpiece can help, but I would have a clue about who to ask or what to look for. I have a wonderful new (to me) Keilwerth alto sax that's perfect, except that the low Bb plays a 1/4 tone sharp. I love the sound of it and just have to train myself to lip down that one note. Of course the potential problem is that when I pick up a different instrument and don't think about it I do the "lip down"on that one as well. Ha! The joys of playing an imperfect instrument! Wish I had the right hands for guitar or piano.
 

guidocreo

Member
Messages
225
Locality
anzio - Italy
Thanks,

actually I think I'm the problem: in the past I used the JJ DV 7* and I didn't have such evident intonation problems (I play the baritone with a band that does pop, R&B and dance). Recently I played the baritone at home using a JJ HR 6 (less open and more resistant than the DV) and with this mouthpiece I think I am more in tune (I will try to post a recording to benefit from your ears ;) ).

I must say that at this time I am sharp in the high register also on the tenor; my hypothesis is that the causes are more than one:
  • here it is hot and very humid weather;
  • I have played, after about 40 years, the soprano clarinet and the bass clarinet and, instinctively, I have started to bite a little even on saxes;
  • I have alternated the various saxophones (SATB) while before I played almost exclusively Baritone and Alto (in 2018) and Baritone and Tenor (in 2019).

I have to work on it.
 
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Wade Cornell

Wade Cornell

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Locality
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What you're saying makes sense. I used to play a Yanagisawa sopranino and Yanagisawa soprano. Both of these required a lot of pressure to hit the high notes (above G2) in tune or they would be flat. I played the Yani sop for probably around 15 years and the sopranino for maybe 10. So those gave me specific habits that were general as compared to adjusting for a single note that was out of tune. When those horns were replaced with different makes I had a very difficult time adjusting to NOT automatically compensate and use a more even embouchure...even though it's much easier and more natural.

It takes dedication to hearing what's in tune and practicing that for a long time to unlearn those sorts of habits and form new habits. I'm now in my mid 70s and have hopefully found the right instruments for me and either have made or am making all the adjustments to be able to play in tune. I don't think I want to switch instruments again and go through the same thing...no matter how wonderful some alternative horn might be! I'm just happy to play and have it sound in tune and be concentrating on the music and not the tuning.

Wishing you all the best in your endeavors.
 
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